Do You Need a Therapist to Treat Depression?

Treating depression with the help of a therapist allows those who suffer from clinical depression to develop coping strategies to deal with everyday stress and triggers that can worsen their condition. On its own, therapy may not be enough to overcome the everyday struggles of severe depression, but it has an important role to play, especially when accompanied by the right medication therapy. Furthermore, those who participate in psychotherapy are more likely to be compliant with prescribed medications.

3 Reasons to Consider a Therapist to Treat Depression

Perspective

Whether you are seeking talk therapy help for your marriage, depression, anxiety or other issues, one of the greatest benefits is the perspective of a trusted third party. For depression, therapy allows you a safe place to express your feelings, thoughts and emotions about the things that are triggering your depression symptoms—a key first step to getting better through talk therapy. 

Accountability

Depression is unpredictable. There are good days and bad days, seasons when your depression worsens, and seasons when your depression improves.  Given the cyclical nature of this disease, the accountability that accompanies a long-term relationship with a therapist is vital.  I tend to make compromises in keeping the commitments I make to myself, but when I vocalize these commitments to a trusted person, I am much more likely to stay the course.  

Goals

When you struggle with severe depression, it can be difficult to establish goals and imagine future activities because the problems of today block the view of what is to come.  Therapists are skilled at helping us develop hope about the future and helping us break the downward spiral of negative thinking that so often accompanies depression.  

Our culture is one of self-sufficiency, but this mindset is best set aside when trying to overcome depression.  Find a good therapist and stick with him or her.  Over the long-term, it will have a great impact.